These types of tumours cannot be treated with the targeted drugs which have hugely improved survival. A team in Glasgow says a faulty piece of DNA which causes leukaemia also has a role in some tumours and could help in research for new drugs. A team at the University of Glasgow investigated the role of the RUNX1 gene, which is one of the most commonly altered genes in leukaemia. However, they have now shown it is also active in the most deadly of triple negative breast cancers. Tests on 483 triple negative breast cancers showed patients testing positive for RUNX1 were four times more likely to die as a result of the cancer than those without it. The results were published in the journal PLoS One. One of the researchers, Dr Karen Blyth, said: "This opens up the exciting possibility of using it [RUNX1] as a new target for treatments."